Monday, November 7, 2011

FACIO - Why Fathers And Children are going to Washington D.C. - Fathers Day 2012

Hopefully, many thousands of fathers from the United States, Canada, and other countries will converge at the Mall in Washington, D.C. on Father’s Day, June 17, 2012. As well, we hope influential people will join us; those who impact or influence the lives of children are encouraged to be there, such as scout leaders, teachers, coaches, social workers, guidance counselors, and both elected and appointed officials. 

We would like to see many children there yet we know that millions of fathers will not be able to see their children on Father’s Day. For those fathers and an estimated twenty-five million children who enjoy no father influences in their lives, we know this day can be an empty, bitter one.

What we hope to achieve is a “show of support” in numbers, and to raise a unified voice for this basic message:

·         The present “social welfare” system is unconscionably broken and must be fixed.

·         Government is the problem; government cannot heal itself.

·         We ask that Congress do only one thing for fathers and all parents: a federal law passed that mandates abducting parents or family members serve a minimum of two days for every day a child is kept hidden from another parent in violation of existing laws or custody stipulations. 

·         We are not asking permission to assert our roles as fathers to our children; rather, we are putting everyone on notice that this begins today.

·         Hence, we expect that government at all levels, as our employees, will follow through with implementation of existing laws that call for prosecution of abducting parents or those who interfere in custodial rights of parents, including cases of international child abduction. 

·         We demand either abandonment of the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction or an immediate closure of loopholes in its application.

In each of these assertions its reason is implied. This is why we must gather unified in Washington, D.C.

  • Study after study proves that parental alienation creates social and economic burdens on all of society. 
  • Immediate problems in children include depression, suicidal tendencies and suicide. Rather than address the cause of these behaviors in children, businesses exploit child victims as new targets of drug dependency.
  • Loss of a father in a child’s life often results in lack of interest in school and learning. Dosing a child with drugs or imbedding negative labels within the child’s psyche is a common “treatment.”
  •  Tens of millions of children are emotionally undernourished. Being raised by a single mother is equivalent to providing only half portions at every meal.
  • In terms of emotional bonding, an opportunity to love and be loved, to hear and be heard, to witness and be witnessed, that child is given, at best, half of what he or she needs.
  • No parent can be both mother and father. In fact, children of single mothers most often receive less than half-nourishment of parenting because working mothers are too busy and too absent to actively share time, listen to and express adequate love with their children.
  • The role of a father as a significant partner in raising children is passed off to strangers who provide impersonal “day care service,” mostly absent any personal connection with the child.

Children are damaged emotionally, if not also physically, by this system. These are our children. This must stop.

Governments here and abroad cannot afford to pay for more child abductions by social workers, for more group foster warehouses, or for more foster care rife with neglect, abuse, and murder of children.

Governments cannot afford for present levels of these evils that it is deeply involved in, let alone more. Governments cannot afford the present level of crime, investigations and prosecutions spawned by victimized children, let alone more.

Governments cannot afford to incarcerate more children raised in fractured families, foster homes and group care, or taken from streets that they’ve run to, but greater numbers are certain to come if we do not act.

Governments cannot afford the present costs of a war against outlawed drugs, nor the costs of picking up the pieces of drug-addicted youth whose addictions are being created by the present system. We cannot afford the costs of expanding that war.

Feminism cannot fix this collection of problems; it has created them. Only genuine fatherhood has a chance to reverse these trends of the past fifty years.